Testicular Fortitude

It's never too late to become the man you were meant to be

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THE very best kind of man and the most useful to his fellows is the man who does what he ought to do.
There is but one cowardice, it is not doing one’s duty. There is but one failure, the failure to discharge an obligation. There is but one sin, not doing what we ought.
The biggest word in the language is OUGHT. The man who keeps it bright within him, always visible and always revered, is a real man.
There is so much of the superfluous among us, so much glory in affairs that are none of our business, so much success that is essential treachery, and so much goodness that is but interesting meanness.
It is better to keep your word than to speak pleasantly.
It is better to tell the truth than to lie entertainingly.
It is better to be loyal than to be affectionate.
It is better honestly to earn the wage paid you than to have grand ideas on the labor problem.
It is better to earn your living and take yourself off other people’s backs than to be a saint or a genius.
It is better for you, if you are an employer to treat them with consideration, and to recognize them as human beings than to wring money from them to give to charity.
It is better to be honest toward women than attractive.
It is better for a woman to deceive no man than to win one.
It is better to pay your debts than to give to the poor.
It is better to have a little efficiency than a lot of knowledge.
It is better to do one good act than to speak many good words.
One earned dollar is worth more to you than a thousand given you.
“There are,” said Elizabeth Inchbald, “persons who love to do everything good but that which their immediate duty requires. There are servants that will serve every one more cheerfully than their own masters; there are men who will distribute money liberally to all except their creditors, and there are wives who will love all mankind better than their husbands. We have acts of generosity, self-denial, and honesty where smaller pains would constitute greater virtues.”
Duty is the egg of all goodness.
It is the primordial protoplasm from which all organized excellences develop.
Without it, religion is hypocrisy, love is poison, activity useless, kindness cruelty, and every good quality as a red apple full of wormy meat.
"OUGHT" taken from Four Minute Essays (1919) by Dr. Frank Crane. (via ianardo)

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“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”


A good one for all the “Men” out there. Remember, Money, gear, clothes… all of it comes and goes. But, skills stay with you forever. Stay sharp and continue to learn the ways of the warrior.

Robert Heinlein (via americanemp)

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Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.
Mahatma Gandhi (via colonelwhiskers)

(Source: worst-ofthe-wildlife)

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It is not the macho thing. It is an indication of weakness. Anger is not an expression of strength. It is an indication of one’s inability to control his thoughts, words, his emotions. Of course it is easy to get angry. When the weakness of anger takes over, the strength of reason leaves. Cultivate within yourselves the mighty power of self-discipline.
Gordon B. Hinckley, “Our Solemn Responsibilities,” Ensign, November 1991 (via demeter42)

(via topperbottoms)

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The Legal Pit: “What the Young Man Should Know” From Harper’s Magazine 1933

thelegalpit:

By Robert Littell, 1933

Glancing out of the window, I can see the subject–and eventual victim–of this inquiry, dangerously perched in the crotch of an old chestnut tree, about fifteen feet above the ground. Should I rush out and tell him to get down? Or should I let him be, hoping that he won’t…

I know this is just a reblog but this is a great article about skills every man should learn and why. Not just physically useful skill but skills with an ethos and an important point behind them. I agree with the author on most points besides his reservations against joining the military, which has been a major part in my life. I do proudly possess some of the abilities listed but like all men, I need to work on a few things

(Source: artofmanliness.com)

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Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.
― Mahatma Gandhi, An Autobiography: The Story Of My Experiments With Truth (via toabsurdityandbeyond)

(via homoveritas-deactivated20131220)

1 note

This story comes from my home state of Wyoming, where men are men, and men are outnumbered by dangerous creatures. That being said this is, flat out, one of the most testosterone drenched, badass stories I’ve ever come across. To be half as brutally manly as C. Dale Petersen is a noble goal to be sure.

This story comes from my home state of Wyoming, where men are men, and men are outnumbered by dangerous creatures. That being said this is, flat out, one of the most testosterone drenched, badass stories I’ve ever come across. To be half as brutally manly as C. Dale Petersen is a noble goal to be sure.